Sunday Research Report

Simsbury, 36 pages of census. 26 individuals in 13 households, 5 of them headed by nonwhites.

Mrs.    Jackson    2
Harry    Jackson    8
John    Thomas    2
Gabriel    Reader    4
Emer    Williams 1

Southington has 28 pages of census returns. 26 individuals again, this time in 16 households, 7 of them headed by nonwhites.

Lampson    Nichols    2
Cuff    Freeman    2
George    Hills    3
James    Freeman    2
Martin    Fowler    3
John L.    Bread    3
Philis    Bellamy    2

Suffield: 34 census pages. 16 individuals in 13 households, only one of them nonwhite – that of Harvey Scott and his (presumed) wife.

West Hartford has 32 census pages. Except it isn’t really West Hartford; that town didn’t exist in 1830. It’s really the part of Hartford that isn’t the city. The first page says “West Hartford or Hartford City limits excepted.” The other section said “City of Hartford.” This is the problem with having these tasks done by people who aren’t familiar with the place.

This adds another 57 households and 154 people to Hartford. 32 of the households were nonwhite, so another long list:

Shim    Camp    6
James    Light    2
Anthony    Johnson    10
Enos    Hendrickson 4
Prince    Cooley    2
Luis    Elky    2
Soloman    Erini    2
Titus    Thomas    8
Maria    Ockry    8
Erastus    Boston    3
William    Browning 3
Amos    Babcock    4
David    Geer    3
Cornwallis Lee    2
Colly    Simirt    2
Lucinda    Dee    3
Asa    Maples    3
Henry    Gardner    5
Thomas    Wells    6
William    Mason    2
Mason    Freeman    5
Charles    Johnson    3
Joseph    Cook    4
Ishmael    Magira    4
Jeremiah Ashur    2
James    Mead    4
Henry    Freeman    2
Henry    Plato    5
Cato    Crapin    5
Maria F. Cambridge 3
Lewis    Fuller    3
John    Loring    2

That’s a total of 496 non-white people in Hartford, in 197 households, 84 of them headed by non-white people.

Not-West Hartford is followed by Wethersfield, with 50 pages of census records. Since it’s one of the 3 oldest towns in Connecticut, that number of pages isn’t surprising.  It had 93 non-white people in 25 households, 7 of them nonwhite.

Samuel    Wells    7
Andrew    Scraw    6
James    Willcox    3
John    Green    6
John    Mitchel    4
Solomon    Murry    2
Aaron    Waples    3

The total also includes the 39 individuals (35 male, 4 female) incarcerated in the Wethersfield State Prison (and this included the second centenarian we’ve seen so far). With a total of 170 people there, this represents 22.94% of the whole prison population – a number that is far larger than the non-white population’s percentage of the total population. I did a little work in the last year or two on the 1850 prison population, blogged here somewhere, and the over-representation problem was found then, too – just as it is today. In other words, race-based incarceration decisions are not at all new.

Windsor comes up next, with 46 pages of census returns. 86 nonwhite individuals lived in 36 households, 13 of them  nonwhite.

Alpheus    Sly    4
Mc(?)    Rego    1
John    Wyse    1
Richard    Brown    9
George    Holden    5
Peter    Peterson 4
Benjamin Franklin 4
David    Norton    8
Abram    Thompson 2
Oliver    Mitchel    3
George    Tyreel    7
Asahel    Williams 2
Thomas    Sharp    3

This also completes the Hartford County data set. 1,051 individuals, compared with 1,388 in Fairfield County. Hartford, with 496, has the largest total number so far, which is not surprising since Fairfield County did not have any genuine cities in 1830.

The end of the county means it’s time for a bar chart:

temp_snip

Next up is Litchfield County. There are a total of 8 counties in Connecticut, so we have quite a long way to go before this is done – fair warning.

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